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List of all content - WinterClimb.com https://winterclimb.com Mon, 06 Dec 2021 12:52:51 +0000 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Climbing forums in the world https://winterclimb.com/articles/item/76-climbing-forums-websites-in-the-world https://winterclimb.com/articles/item/76-climbing-forums-websites-in-the-world Climbing forums in the world

In almost every country where is rock is usually some climbing community. There are lot of local websites about climbing, but not every has a climbing forum, where you can speak with climbing community in this country. Here is list of climbing forums:

Argentina

?

Australia

www.chockstone.org/Forum/Forum.asp - Climbing in Victoria region

www.thecrag.com/climbing/australia/forum

www.climberswa.asn.au/forum/

Austria

www.bergsteigen.com/forum

Brazil

www.escaladabrasil.com/osite/modules.php?name=Forums

Canada

ontarioclimbing.com/forum/

www.climbeasterncanada.com/

squamishclimbing.com/squamish_climbing_bb/

www.gravsports-ice.com/icethreads/ - forum about ice climbing and also mountaineering

China

?

Croatia

www.planinarenje.net/forum/forum.php

www.hps.hr/forum/

Czech Republic

www.lezec.cz/diskuse.php

Finland

www.slouppi.net/phpBB3/ - bouldering

www.relaa.com/forum

http://www.climbing.fi/skil/

France

?

Germany

forum.klettern.de/forum/klettern-bergsteigen-und-klettern/

forum.climbing.de/

Greece

www.routes.gr/Community/viewforum.php?f=1

climbkalymnos.com/bbpress/

www.climbincrete.com/modules/forum/index.php

Iceland

?

India

?

International

www.mountainproject.com/forums/

www.summitpost.org/phpBB3/

www.rockclimbing.com/cgi-bin/forum/gforum.cgi

www.8a.nu/

Ireland

forum.climbing.ie

Italy

www.forum.planetmountain.com/phpBB2/index.php

www.falesia.it/Forums.html

www.gulliver.it/forum/

Japan

?

Mexico

?

New Zealand

climber.co.nz/forum

Norway

www.friflyt.no/Forum/Klatring

Poland

brytan.com.pl/forum/

wspinanie.pl/forum/

Portugal

?

Romania

hwww.carpati.org/forum/

Russia

?

Slovakia

www.climb.sk/forum/

Slovenia

?

South Africa

www.climbing.co.za/forum/

South Corea

www.koreaontherocks.com/forums/

Spain

desnivel.com/foros

www.yumping.com/foro/escalada

Sweden

?

Switzerland

www.kletterportal.ch/forum

Turkey

?

United Kingdon

www.ukclimbing.com/forums - Probably most popular climbing forum in UK

www.ukhillwalking.com/forums - Forum more about hiking, but I think that mountaineering can be also here

Ukraine

?

United States

www.mountainproject.com/forums

www.rockclimbing.com/cgi-bin/forum/gforum.cgi

www.supertopo.com/climbing/forum.php

 

I'm going to submit information about some websites about climbing. If you can recomend any, leave an info in comment or send me an email.

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rob.granowski@gmail.com (Damian Granowski) Articles Tue, 09 Jun 2015 06:26:49 +0000
Ramon Marin - Who is who? https://winterclimb.com/articles/item/75-ramon-marin-interview-who-is-who https://winterclimb.com/articles/item/75-ramon-marin-interview-who-is-who Ramon Marin - Who is who?

I meet Ramon Marin in Canmore (Canada), where we climb in Cineplex. He do Musashi M12, Steel Koan M13+ and some nice icefalls. Here is interview with this strong guy from Spain (or England).

Damian Granowski: Date of birth and how long you climb?

Ramon Marin: Born in 1977, so I’m 37 years old. My first day out climbing I was 14, but only started seriously age 25.

Best OS in dry-tooling and ice?

My best onsight is M10 and W6+

Best RP on dry-tooling and ice?

M13+ with Steel Koan (Cineplex)

 Pink Panther kandersteg Ramon Marin

Ramon on Pink Panther M9+ in Kandersteg (Switzerland). Photo. arch. Ramon Marin

Which Ice tools and crampons?

E-Climb Cryo Pro and Scarpa Rebel Ice and La Sportive Mega Ice

Sponsors?

E-Climb, Appkit and Gocragging.com

The best place on competitions and climbing meetings?

1st in the Canmore Drytooling competition and also tanked 27th on Ice Climbing World Cup in Sass Fee.

How you start climbing with Ice-tools? First you climbed in summer or winter?

I started in Scotland doing winter climbing, but only for two weekends. But the place where I really started and getting strong was on the chalk cliff of Brighton, onto British South Coast.

Some people climb in winter, because it is for them some alternative from climbing indoors, others just like it. What's your favorite kind of climbing? What keeps you at it?

I do it mainly because I grew up spending the winter weekends in the mountains with my local ski club. I later became a ski instructor. Since then I spend the winters doing winter stuff, like skiing or ice, and summer doing rock climbing. I do it because it keeps me climbing no matter the season and also because I truly love it, I think it’s really special.

Climbing ice pillar. Photo arch. Ramon Marin

What is most important to you in winter climbing? The desire for adventure, difficulties, winter climate, or perhaps fame and women wink emoticon?

Of course for the fame and the women, what else! No really, I love the adventure factor, the fact that not many people, not even rock climbers, can get do what I do, and go to some pretty wild places. Starting a ice route straight off the black volcanic sand of an Icelandic beach is an experience not many climbers get to see.

Of course, we can not escape from a series of questions like "Most", What is your favourite dry-tooling area? What is it that you want to go back?

For me dry tooling is just means to an end, training for the bigger mountains. I love it, but it’s just training. I like Ueschenen, Eptingen, L’Usine… but what inspires me the most are the badass mixed walls like Breightwangflue in Kandersteg and Stanley Headwall in Canada. The real stuff! But to answer your question, my favourite drytooling crag is White Goods, in North Wales.

Apart from the money, which peak you would most go climb? What is it in itself?

I’m not driven to climb peaks, I’m more interested in the routes and style. If I have to choose, I’d say Flying Circus and NIN in Kandersteg and Rocket Man and Riptide in the Rockies, Illuminati in Dolomites… but there’s many many more I can’t remember right now. Though I’d like to climb the Eiger one day.

Photo arch. Ramon Marin

The most beautiful route which you do? What contributed to the fact that deserves to be called?

I haven’d done many first ascents, but the one that really stands out is Kraftwerk Wi6 in Kandersteg. It’s a free-standing pillar that forms very rarely and Markus Stofer let me get the first ascent.

Climbing equipment is evolving all the time, skills of climbers also grow. How do you think, where will go mixed climbing?

The future of mixed climbing in the traditionally protected lines, for sure. I think there’s a cap to how big a roof can be and how long a move a human can do. I reckon the sport mixed grade will top at around M16 maybe. But the truth is that there’s hardly any ice on routes that are harder than M11, the ground is too steep for ice to form. So I think if you like what real mixed climbing (mixing ice & rock) then you have to start looking at trad lines. Of course there’s a generation of drytoolers that have started by tooling and are not interested in real mixed, but I think they got it all wrong. It’s silly to go and do Ironman in the middle of August… you should be in Ceuse instead!

Nice ice. Photo arch. Ramon Marin

Favorite climbing gear, which would you recommend to anyone?

I truly think the E-Climb Cryo Pro are the best mixed/drytooling axe, many because they are a lot longer that the rest of tools in the maket. And of course the E-Clib screw because you can change the tips and have brand new screws for 17 Euros. But if you are rich, the Petzl Laser and BD Express are amazing too. For rope I think the FixeRoca are the best for you money. Comp boots I’d recommend the Scarpa Rebel Ice.

Apparently, outside climbing, there are other hobbies... What do you like doing in your free time, when not climbing? (answer "I read climbing websites" is not correct)

Is there a life outside climbing? Really? Ah, I’m pretty psyched about skiing! And I do love my job too, graphic design, but it’s not a passion anymore. I surfed for a while, but the wetsuit hasn’t got wet in more than two years.

The most difficult mountain route, which you ascent? What factors made up for the difficulties? You encourage, or reborn to repeat it?

The hardest mixed route has been Steel Koan M13+ (Cineplex, Canada) but to be honest, The Guardian of the Underworld M12 in Lake District wasn’t much easier. They are both massive roof with loads of long and hard moves. As for multipitch, Cryophobia M8 and Alpha Saule M6+ trad were also good accomplishments. Both are sustained and pretty exposed. For ice Mehr Power (in Wi6+ conditions) was the hardest I’ve onsighted.

Ramon on Musashi M12 in Cineplex. Photo. arch. Ramon Marin

What do you think is the best advice for beginners (and not only) winter climbers?

Find a mentor if you can, it’s the best way to start. Join a 3-day course in Scotland, Alps or Tatra with a good guide to teach all the basics. Then do some dry tooling or chalk climbing to get strong. You should be up and running in a season, like I did myself. Save money and buy all the kit and find similar keen people to get out and get psyched.

Winter is already coming to an end. You will throw your gear into the closet and get back to the rocks? Or you Can not give up and you'll be somewhere else to look for the rocking?

The axes have been firmly packed since my return from Canada. Normally I carry on doing winter and dry tooling until end of march, but this year I’m just really psyched for rock climbing.

FA on Kraftwerk WI6. Photo. arch. Ramon Marin

About Ramon

Born in Barcelona in 1977, I’ve been permanent resident in the UK for the last 10 years. I’m very active member of the British climbing community and get featured in the climbing media on a regular basis. I also organize the only Drytooling event in the UK, which is growing in popularity. My climbing blog has had 150k pageviews, mostly by British, Spanish and American audience.

Climbing CV

Mixed & Ice
Mix Isch Fix M11 (Dobbiaco, Dolomites. Italy)
Stump Man M11 (second ascent) North Wales, UK)
Fire Roasted M10+ (Haffner Creek. Canada)
Power Pact M10 (White Goods, North Wales UK)
Chain Wall M10 (Llanberis, North Wales UK)
Orgasmo M9 (Cineplex, Canadia Rockies)
Cryophobia Wi6 / M8+ (Ghost. Canadian Rockies)
The Real Big Drip Wi6+ / M8 (Ghost Valley. Canada)
Mehr Power durch sportliche Aufkleber Wi6+ (Kandersteg. Switzerland)
Edel and Stark Wi6 / M8 (Kiental. Switzerland)
Pilsner Piller WI6 (Field. Canadian Rockies)
Ice Nine WI6 (Icefields Parkway. Canada)
Curtain Call WI6 (Icefields Parkway. Canada)
Whiteman Falls WI6 (Kannanaskis Country. Canada
Nemesis WI6 (Stanley Headwall. Canada)
In der wurze liegt die kurze WI6 (Kiental. Switzerland)
Rubezahl WI6 (Kandersteg. Switzerland)
Reise Intergral WI6+ R (Kandersteg. Switzerland)

Sport Climbing
Super lolita F8a. (Kalymnos. Greece)
Black Snake Moan F8a. (Brean Down. UK
Cider Soak F8a. (Antseys Cove. UK)
Leather Whip Mick F8a. (Antseys Cove. UK)
Red Thunder F8a. (Torbryan UK)

Trad
Warpath E5 6a. (Roscolyn, UK)
Get some in E5 6a. (Pembroke, UK)

Other interviews from series "Who is who?"

Raphael Slawinski

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rob.granowski@gmail.com (Damian Granowski) Articles Sun, 31 May 2015 07:22:00 +0000
Raphael Slawinski – Who is Who? https://winterclimb.com/articles/item/74-raphael-slawinski-interview-who-is-who https://winterclimb.com/articles/item/74-raphael-slawinski-interview-who-is-who Raphael Slawinski – Who is Who?

In may 2014 I made interview with Raphael Slawinski. Originally interview was in polish, but I translated this to english. You must be prepared, than in text will be some (MY) translation mistakes :-). Original text you will find here.

Damian Granowski: Date of birth and how long you climb?
Raphael Slawinski: I was born in 1967. I Climb from the early 70's. I can not say exactly since when, I started early.

Best OS in dry-tooling and ice?
In dry-tooling M11 + (
Rocky Mountain Horror Picture Show in Cineplex ), but it was in ancient times (2003 ), and even with spurs. In ice I did not know if I've ever done more than WI6 +. The fresh ice on lead is a pretty damn demanding.

Best RP on dry-tooling and ice?
In dry-tool
ing M12 (Piltdown Man Haffner and Musashi at Cineplex ). For Me does not exist concept of RP on Ice.

Which Ice tools and crampons?
That is changing. Currently Fuel BD and BD Stinger at 80 % of my climbing.

Sponsors?
Arc'teryx , Black Diamond and Scarpa.

Raphael Slawinski on Nachtmahr. Photo. arch. Raphael Slawinski

The best place on competitions and climbing meetings?
Three times first place in Ouray in the early 2000s. First place in Festiglace du Quebec. From more than 10 years I do not take part in the competition.

How you start climbing with Ice-tools? First you climbed in summer or winter?
I
start from mixed climbing, because the first steps in climbing I done on easy classic ice routes. Then technical climbing in the ice and the rock went together.

{loadposition position-14}

Some people climb in winter, because it is for them some alternative from climbing indoors, others just like it. What's your favorite kind of climbing? What keeps you at it?
I like everything. This diversity, from indoor climbing to Karakorum, means that after nearly a quarter of a century continued to climb . But it's true that I like winter: ice, mixt, dry-tool
ing, skiing, even from time to time winter alpine routes. Which is good, because winter in the Canadian Rockies, where I live, is long.

Raphael on 10 KFG (Kraków Mountain Festival). Wojciech Lembryk / KFG

What is most important to you in winter climbing? The desire for adventure, difficulties, winter climate, or perhaps fame and women ;-)?
A bit of all the above. Adventure, winter landscape and hard climbing in such an environment.

Of course, we can not escape from a series of questions like "Most", What is your favorite dry-tooling area? What is it that you want to go back?
For several years we develop a new spot with a friends w
hich we called El Dorado. Nothing special, but it is "my" and I spend a lot of time there. It has two advantages: it is close, so I can jump out there even in the afternoon, and unlike many areas, there are no drilled holes for Ice-tools and crampons.

<a target='_blank'  data-cke-saved-href='http://drytooling.com.pl/baza/ludzie/1060-rafal-slawinski' href='http://drytooling.com.pl/baza/ludzie/1060-rafal-slawinski' title='Rafał Sławiński - Biografia, ciekawostki, dokonania górskie, filmy' class='redlinker'>Rafał Sławiński</a> wspina się mikstowo na kluczowym wyciągu The Peach

Raphael on crux pith Second Go at The Peach

Apart from the money, which peak you would most go climb? What is it in itself?
Gasherbrum IV. I think one of the most beautiful an
d difficult mountains in the world.

The most beautiful route which you do? What contributed to the fact that deserves to be called?
It's hard to say, there were so man
y. From new routes can be DTCB (8 pitches , M7 ) at Mt. Andromeda in the Rocky Mountains. We made route onsight, but almost to the end we were not sure whether be possible.

Climbing equipment is evolving all the time, skills
of climbers also grow. How do you think, where will go mixt climbing?
I can not say, not giving up too much in the latest currents. I have the impression that difficult dry-tool
ing and competitions go more and more of the "real " climbing. There is nothing wrong with that, that is the nature of specialization, but relying on Wojtek Kurtyka, I hope that in the future mixt not be limited only to the numbers.

Raphael on ice pitch on K6 West. Photo: Ian Welsted

Favorite climbing gear, which would you recommend to anyone?
As one who likes it. As already mentioned,
when I not climb in “mixt gardens” I climb on BD Fuel and Stinger. Boots Scarpa Phantom Guide. It is important that the equipment work well in different conditions.

{loadposition position-14}

Apparently, outside climbing, there are other
hobbies... What do you like doing in your free time, when not climbing? (answer "I read climbing websites" is not correct)
Hmm, I do not have too much time for other interests. Family life, work at the university, climbing and
you have already filled time.

Sławiński Rafał na Spray ON

 Raphael on Spray On. Photo. arch.: Rafał Sławiński

The most difficult mountain route, which you ascent? What factors made ​​up for the difficulties? You encourage, or reborn to repeat it?
Dogleg Couloir, a new route on the north face of Mt. Chephren in the Rocky Mountains. The lower part is not especially difficult, but the upper chimneys offer demanding dry-tooling, pitch after pitch. We had poor conditions, because snow storm caught us, but in better conditions I recommended.

What do you think is the best advice for beginners (and not only)
winter climbers?
Be aware of the potential consequences of what you do, but on the other hand,
if everything is OK then go for it!

Winter is already coming to an end.
You will throw your gear into the closet and get back to the rocks? Or you Can not give up and you'll be somewhere else to look for the rocking?
Less than two weeks I'm heading to Alaska.

Photo. arch. Raphael Slawinski

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rob.granowski@gmail.com (Damian Granowski) Articles Wed, 27 May 2015 12:28:15 +0000
Marcin “Yeti” Tomaszewski - from alpine to bigwall https://winterclimb.com/climbing-base/item/72-marcin-tomaszewski https://winterclimb.com/climbing-base/item/72-marcin-tomaszewski Marcin “Yeti” Tomaszewski - from alpine to bigwall

A Polish climber, alpinist and climbing instructor. Known for his multipitch ascents both in the big wall and alpine style. Born in 1975 in Poland. He’s been climbing for more than 22 years. A member of the Polish National Team in alpine climbing. From the very beginning he’s been inspired mostly by challenges such as opening new routes in the most inaccessible and vertical faces in the world.

 

Although he has already managed to ascend some of them, year by year he feels hungry for more. However, his life consists not only of climbing as such as he’s devoted to the promotion of the sport in Poland by means of running rock climbing courses and indoor training units, organizing competitions and climbing shows, as well as hosting radio shows. Since 1997, he’s been organizing the Fight Club National Climbing Comp, the event he’s the originator of. In 2005 he became a sport climbing instructor and opened his own climbing school in Szczecin, Poland. Starting from 2009 he’s been implementing the 4 Elements project (/Pl./ 4 Żywioły, www.4zywioly.net) aiming at climbing ascents in four distinctive mountainous regions (Patagonia, Alaska, Baffin Island, Venezuela).

marcin tomaszewski ziemia baffina

On Baffin Island. Photo: David Kaszlikowski

The timeline of the expeditions.

2000 Greenland, Nalumasortoq, new route
2001 Pakistan, Nangmah Valley, Denbor, new route
2002 Baffin Island, Mount Thor, new route
2003 Alaska, Shadows Glacier, new route
2004 India, Garhwal, Mount Meru, the Shark’s Fin route
2005 Yosemite, Salathé Wall, 27h non-stop
2006 Patagonia, Cerro Torre, the Commpressor route
2006 Norway, Trollvegen
2006 China, Qonglai Mountains, Seerdengpu
2007 Norway, Innset Ice climbing.
2007 Alaska, Throne, new route graded 7a
2007 Pakistan, Trango Tower, ascent attempt
2009 Patagonia, Argentina, Fitz Roy, solo attempt
2009 Alaska, Mt. Barril, III, 1200 m solo climb, Mt. Johnson, escalator M5, Wi4 1200 m solo climb
2010 Venezuela, Acopan Tepui, new route
2010 China, Qonglai Mountains, Seerdengpu
2012 Canada, Baffin Island, Polar Sun Spire, new route
2012 Argentina, Patagonia, Cerro Torre, the Ferrari route
2013 Pakistan, Great Trango Tower, new route called Bushido
2014 Alaska, Mount Dickey.
2015 Winter. New line Trollveggen, "Katharsis. M7 / A4

Other achievements:

2014 "TRAVELER" Award, National Geographic Traveler.
2014- International Team Camp / Cassin
2014- "KOLOS" Award for Bushido pave the way for the Great Trango Tower in 2013
2013 - Distinction EpicTV channel. The award of the highest ratings for crossing the road BigWall BUSHIDO in Pakistan with all achievements from around the world in 2013.
2013- the award of present-day Ministry of Sport and Tourism for exceptional achievements if the field of alpinism
2012 – nomination for the Travellery 2012 award given by the National Geographic Traveller Magazine, the Achievement of the Year category
2012 – the award of present-day Ministry of Sport and Tourism for achievements in the field of alpinism in 2012
2012 – the award of the Kolosy 2012 for the opening of a new route on Baffin Island, Canada
2008 – the Brytan of the Year award given by the wspinanie.pl portal for the solo opening of a new free climb on the Kazalnica Mięguszowiecka Wall in the Tatra Mountains in winter
2007 – the award of the Brytan climbing service for the ascents in the Tatra Mountains in 2006
2004 – the main Kolos 2003 award in the category of alpinism for the opening of a new route, Ostatni Krzyk Motyla (/Eng./ Butterfly’s Last Cry ), in Alaska.
2004 – nomination for the Piolet d'or award (Grenoble, France) each year honouring seven greatest achievements in the field of alpinism from all over the world; nomination for the opening of a new route, Ostatni Krzyk Motyla (/Eng./ Butterfly’s Last Cry), in Alaska in 2003.
2003- the award of present-day Ministry of Sport and Tourism for achievements in the field of alpinism in 2003
2003 – the first place at a sport climbing comp in Szczecin
2003- the medal for sport achievements in the field of alpinism received during the celebrations of the 100th anniversary of the Polish Mountaineering Association
2003 – the Mayor of Szczecin award for promoting the city in the world
2003 - the Kolosy award in the category of alpinism for the opening of a new route on the Mount Thor face, Baffin Island.
2002- 2nd place at the event of the National Cup in sport climbing series on the Ducal Castle in Szczecin
2001- 3rd place at the event of the National Cup in sport climbing series on the arch in the Summer Theatre in Szczecin
2001- The Mountain Film Festival in Lądek Zdrój, 1st place in the category of Polish Picture for the “Planeta Spisek” (/Eng./ “A Planet Called Treason” ) picture directed by Sławomir Ejsymont
2000- the award of present-day Ministry of Sport and Tourism for exceptional achievements if the field of alpinism
1999- Poznań, Poland- 1st place in the Western Poland Championship in sport climbing on an artificial wall
1998- Warsaw, Poland – Vice-Championship at the Central Poland Championship in sport climbing on an artificial wall
1997- the award of the Brytan magazine for opening a new route on the Kazalnica Mięguszowiecka wall during a solo winter climb
1996- the award of Polish Mountaineering Association for achievements and climbing activity in the Tatra Mountains

Source: Profile FB "Polish Annapurna IV Expedition 2015"

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rob.granowski@gmail.com (Damian Granowski) Mountain Base Thu, 14 May 2015 09:40:31 +0000
Alps / Matterhorn https://winterclimb.com/climbing-base/climbing-conditions-in-mountains/item/70-webcam-zermatt-matterhorn https://winterclimb.com/climbing-base/climbing-conditions-in-mountains/item/70-webcam-zermatt-matterhorn Alps / Matterhorn

Below you have live webcam to Matterhorn.

 

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rob.granowski@gmail.com (Damian Granowski) Webcams Tue, 06 May 2014 00:00:00 +0000
JJ on Caveman ~M10 https://winterclimb.com/video/item/69-jedrzej-jablonski-on-caveman-haffner-cave https://winterclimb.com/video/item/69-jedrzej-jablonski-on-caveman-haffner-cave JJ on Caveman ~M10

Video from Haffner Cave in Canadian Rockies. Jędrzej Jabłoński (JJ) send classic route Caveman ~M10 (author give M10-). JJ climb without figure 4/9.

One of the first routes about grade M10- on the world. Now without spurs is harder to climb :-).

{youtube}i-Zu5QTNAdw{/youtube}

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rob.granowski@gmail.com (Damian Granowski) Videos Wed, 22 Apr 2015 00:00:00 +0000
The Wild Thing in Rockies by Takeshi Tani and Yamada Toshiyuki https://winterclimb.com/news/item/68-the-wild-thing-tani-toshiyuki https://winterclimb.com/news/item/68-the-wild-thing-tani-toshiyuki The Wild Thing in Rockies by Takeshi Tani and Yamada Toshiyuki

Takeshi Tani and Yamada Toshiyuki repeats The Wild Thing Ⅵ M7 WI5 1300m on east face of Mt. Chephren in the Canadian Rockies. 45 hours from car to car.

 

Yamada Toshiyuki on Wild Thing. Photo Takeshi Tani

The Wild Thing was first climbed in 1987 by Peter Arbic, Barry Blanchard, and Ward Robinson, after four previous attempts by Blanchard. The first ascent took three long days and was graded 5.10 A3 WI4, with a crux rock corner that consumed most of a day. In 2008 route has probably first free ascent by team Jon Simms - Jon Walsh.

Yamada Toshiyuki on Wild Thing. Photo Takeshi Tani

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rob.granowski@gmail.com (Damian Granowski) News Wed, 22 Apr 2015 00:00:00 +0000
Committed https://winterclimb.com/video/item/67-committed https://winterclimb.com/video/item/67-committed Committed

Sometimes when you commit to a goal, you find that it pushes the boundaries of what you thought was possible. "Last year I set myself up with the idea that I wanted to be the first American woman to climb M11." Mountain Hardwear athlete Dawn Glanc is an ice climber and mixed climber from Ouray, Colorado. For Dawn, M11 is just the beginning. What's your M11?

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{vimeo}120839254{/vimeo}

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rob.granowski@gmail.com (Damian Granowski) Videos Thu, 16 Apr 2015 00:00:00 +0000
TNF Verto S6K Extreme – gear review https://winterclimb.com/outdoor-gear-equipment/item/66-tnf-verto-s6k-extreme-gear-review https://winterclimb.com/outdoor-gear-equipment/item/66-tnf-verto-s6k-extreme-gear-review TNF Verto S6K Extreme – gear review

For climbing trip to Canada I took the shoes The North Face Verto Extreme S6K. I was expecting to -15 / -25 ° C and hard ice/mixed climbing, where shoes with inner boots will be ideal. Life, however, somewhat verified to use them in the field and an exceptionally warm winter meant that the temperature hovered around -5 / 15 ° C. Fortunately, at the last moment I took TNF Verto S6K Glacier GTX (review here).

Finally I was able to climb in the Verto S6K Extreme for two days in Canada, where the temperature dropped to -15 (Murchison Falls and Slipstream). Therefore, it will not be reviewed Verto S6K extreme, but rather a "first impression" of their use. Therefore, all observations are based on two days of use, so they can still change. On the right you will probably review to wait until next winter.

Description

 



Best-in-class, fully compatible with crampons, boots to acquire the highest mountain peaks. Have drawn pads, gaiters, waterproof membrane HydroSeal®, isolation of aero-gel for added thermal protection and CRADLE ™ technology. Smartlite® mud guards are lighter and more protected than rubber. They have the best-in-class EVA insert Northotic ™ Pro + gel in the heel.

joomplu:29

Average weight: 1010 g (½ pairs) / 2020 g (pair) - Men 9

Upper properties:

    ballistic nylon uppers

    waterproof membrane HydroSeal®

    PU protectors Smartlite® lowering mud weight of the shoe and to provide better protection than traditional rubber pads

    PrimaLoft® insulation 200g

    Isolation of aero-gel at the height of the fingers, around and under the foot for added thermal protection

    best-in-class EVA footbed Northotic ™ Pro + with gel heel, shock-absorbing Ortholite ™ panels at the height of the forefoot and a stabilizing TPU Cradle ™ technology

    TPU heel stabilizer CRADLE ™ technology with spoiler for cancers snow

Properties soles:

    compatible with crampons

    EVA midsole with micropores

    Vibram outsole Mulaz

    Carbon platform for extra strength

Price: 650 $ (The North Face shop)

First impressions

Of course, the first thing you do with shoes that weigh:-). The manufacturer says the size 9 (EU 42) weight 1010 grams (one shoe). My shoe size 10.5 (44) weighs 1154 grams (323 grams for inner boot), which is a good result for the inner boots. Other Shoes La Sportiva Spantik 1261 play, La Sportiva Baruntse 1267 grams, Scarpa Phantom 6000 1000 grams. Weight probably given for the number 42.

I suggest buying the shoe about half a centimeter buy a bigger size than we have foot. However, this may change, if the shoe a little break.

The North Face company began producing shoes in winter alpine 2011/12. She began by Verto S4K GTX model. Then came Verto S6K GTX dedicated to higher altitudes (about 6,000 meters). Then Verto S6K Extreme (more armored model of internal booties). The series closes Verto S8K dedicated to eight-thousanders.

S6K Verto is the third model in the order, designed for multi-day winter climbing to the tops of the surrounding 6000 meters. From its predecessor Verto Glacier GTX S6K it varies a lot: inner boots internal Geiter material (zipped), different design and colors. Common elements is known to be the sole, rubber rim, the shape of the hoof, and probably several design solutions invisible from the outside.

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But overall it is warmer than a single layer Verto S6K. This provides a two-layer construction of the shoe uppers, a thicker sole, and 200 grams PrimaLoft (in Verto S6K was Thinsulate heat insulation). At -15 did not feel cold feet.

Typical today, covering to protect against moisture is zip lining. Upper is made of ballistic nylon (the strongest nylon fabric on the market). At the top of the upper is stitched rubber rim that protects from falling snow. The whole coated PU (polyurethane) to increase water resistance. Large waterproof YKK went quite hard at the beginning, so I decided to treat it with silicone grease, which greatly helped in his fasten;).

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Vibram sole has a fairly deep tread well adapted for walking on snow. In case we had to climb in them, we have called on the tip of the shoe. "Climbing Zone". A similar outsole is in Verto S6K GTX, so it looks like it will be good to keep the snow and rock.

The depreciation is "EVA Northotic ™ Pro + with gel heel, shock-absorbing Ortholite ™ panels at the height of the forefoot and a stabilizing TPU Cradle ™ technology." Without going into the technical details, refer to the manufacturer's website.

Of course, we can pin automatic crampons. Personally, I use BD Cyborg crampons that sit on them stable.

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Shoes Verto Extreme S6K in hand with crampons BD Cyborg. Photo. Damian Granowski

Mounted over a fairly wide sole with rubber rim to prevent wet and mechanical damage. Front of the shoe is lined with black leatherette.

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Front of the boot. Photo. Damian Granowski

Lace-up boots are insulated with 200 grams PrimaLoft + AEROTHERM technology is used. They have laces with locking clip that easily lock / unlock with gloves. Inner boot has a pad under the foot.

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In general, the order of lacing in the Verto S6K Extreme, is as follows. Inner boot first, then the ordinary in the shoe lacing and Velcro fastening ankle stabilizer.

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Details of inner boots

The shoe has a wide belt loops, we can catch gloves to hold the shoe when inserting Botka (founded on foot). Naturally there will be a convenient carabiner to attach shoes, to the position.

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Loop at the back of the shoe. Photo. Damian Granowski

Inner boot is quite soft, so if you put your foot booties established, it often does not fit well. Ideally put inner boot so earlier, and then the foot.

Overall Impressions

For two days in ice climbing shoes in terms of thermals were doing great. At minus 15 ° C and thin socks did not feel cold. It's in them as well (of course, not like the Verto Glacier S6K), and climbing in the ice went well enough. As for my taste might be a bit stiffer (higher bond laces) so would be less tired in the Alpine ice.

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In conclusion, TNF Verto S6K Extreme promises to be a successful alpine boot. It should be appreciated by all those who are planning multi day of climbing or climbing in winter frosts stout. At the end of the coming winter will get probably have a full review, so please be patient.

More photos in the gallery

Oryginal text (in polish)

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rob.granowski@gmail.com (Damian Granowski) Gear Thu, 16 Apr 2015 00:00:00 +0000
How to Choose a climbing Harness? https://winterclimb.com/outdoor-gear-equipment/item/65-climbing-harness-how-to-choose https://winterclimb.com/outdoor-gear-equipment/item/65-climbing-harness-how-to-choose How to Choose a climbing Harness?

Climbing harnesses are essential for climbing. They're usually designed with minimal padding, the assumption being that you'll hang in your harness little if at all, so comfort can take a back seat to weight. Mountaineers expect to travel in snowy or wet conditions, to take bathroom breaks while still in the harness and to wear the harness over a variety of layers, including taking it on and off over boots and crampons. As a result, mountaineering harnesses are typically made of non-absorbent material, have detachable leg loops to facilitate bathroom breaks, and adjust sufficiently to accommodate a variety of layers.

Consider Your Climbing Style

What kind(s) of climbing do you plan on doing most often? This will help you decide what features are the most important.

All-round - These are also known as all-around, crag or sport harnesses. Ideal for beginners, they are designed to function well in a number of climbing applications such as top-roping, sport and gym climbing. Most have padded leg loops and waistbelts for maximum comfort when working a route or taking a fall. Detachable leg loops let you answer calls of nature without untying from the rope. Most models also feature convenient gear racking loops for easy access to hardware or chalk bag without the need for a shoulder sling. These harnesses typically feature a dedicated front loop so you can easily attach a belay/rappel device.

 

Harness Jasper CR 4 Camp

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Alpine - Designed for long mountain trips, these harnesses typically feature minimal padding and features in order to save weight and bulk. Non-absorbent materials are used to withstand the rough weather often encountered in glacier and alpine climbing. Highly adjustable waistbelt and leg loops allow for clothing changes between pre-dawn chill and afternoon sunshine. Leg loops are usually detachable so you can take toilet breaks while staying tied into the rope at the waist.

Black Diamond Xenos harness. Dedicated to winter climbing

Big Wall - These harnesses are used by climbers doing multi-pitch, multi-day climbs such as those in Yosemite Valley. They feature lots of padding on the waistbelt and leg loops to relieve pressure during hanging belays or aid climbing. Multiple gear loops allow handy on-harness and take some of the weight off your shoulder gear sling. They usually feature a full-strength haul loop in back for towing a rope or heavy gear bag.

Lot of climbing gear on loops. Photo: Damian Granowski

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How to check if harness is good for you?

1. Try on the harness over the bulkiest clothing layers you might wear while mountaineering. This should include your shell jacket and snow pants. Make sure that the waist belt sits above the crest of your hip bones and can cinch down tightly enough that you can slide your hand between the harness and your waist but don't have room to turn your hand around.
2. Perform the same fit test for the leg loops: When they are cinched down you should be able to slip your hand between the loop and your thigh, but you shouldn't have room to turn your hand around.
3. Put on your mountaineering boots and crampons, if you have them, and try taking the harness off and putting it back on over the extra footwear. Both leg loops and waist belt should adjust sufficiently to allow this without a struggle.
4.  Take the harness off, strip down to the lightest layers you think you might wear while mountaineering, put the harness on again, and perform both fit tests---waist belt and leg loops---again. If the harness you're trying on cannot be adjusted to fit you both in bulky layers and stripped-down layers, it's not suitable for mountaineering.
5. Inspect the harness to make sure that the leg loops are detachable (there will be a small clip joining each leg loop to the waist belt, via a piece of elastic webbing) and that the material is non-absorbent; these are important elements in a mountaineering harness.

Uprząż Camp Energy dedykowana do wspinaczki sportowej

Camp Energy harness, dedicated for sport climbing

Even though comfort is a secondary consideration for mountaineering harnesses, you should still tie in to the harness and perform a "hang test" if the shop's facilities allow it. This involves suspending your full weight from a climbing rope, while wearing the harness, to make sure that it fits comfortably enough to permit you to sit for at least short periods of time. If the harness bites into your skin anywhere or pinches you uncomfortably you won't be able to bear sitting in it for any length of time; try to find a different harness that is not so uncomfortable.

Cost of climbing harnesses

Differences between a $45 harness and an $75 harness may be difficult to see. You do not need to pay many to get a safe harness. However, harnesses are tough and should last a while, so durability is often the difference between expensive and moderately-priced harnesses. Consider that you may be climbing in this thing for a few years before jumping at that small price tag.

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rob.granowski@gmail.com (Damian Granowski) Gear Wed, 16 Apr 2014 00:00:00 +0000